Literary Africa

Destinations

El-Muniria Hotel and The Tangerinn, Tangier, Morocco
Africa
Jo Cahill

The Tangerinn, Tangier, Morocco

Photo credit: Kent MacElwee on Visualhunt / CC BY-NC-ND Website: https://www.facebook.com/thetangerinnpub/ Physical address: 1 Rue Magellan, Tangier Phone number: +212 613 321594 Business hours: 8pm-midnight daily DISCLOSURE: This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you buy something after clicking our link to the retailer, we make a small commission on the sale. You

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Terra Kulture, Lagos, Nigeria
Africa
Jo Cahill

Terra Kulture Book Store, Lagos, Nigeria

More than just a bookstore, Terra Kulture is a hub for all things culture in Lagos, Nigeria. Recommended by novelist, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, as one of her favourite spots in the city, and location of choice for the launch of her acclaimed book, Americanah, Terra Kulture is a popular venue for locals, expats and visitors from around the world.

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El-Muniria Hotel and The Tangerinn, Tangier, Morocco
Africa
Jo Cahill

Hotel El-Muniria, Tangier, Morocco

When William S. Burroughs, author of Naked Lunch, arrived in Tangier, Morocco, in the mid-1950s, he found a city ready to indulge him in any vice that took his fancy. Jointly administered by France, Spain and the UK when it first became an international zone in 1924, its leadership had become even more cosmopolitan with Portugal, Italy, Belgium, Sweden, the Netherlands and the USA joining in on the action later.

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Book Reviews

Cigarette Number Seven by Donia Kamal
Africa
Jo Cahill

Review: Cigarette Number Seven – Donia Kamal

Set largely within the 18 days of protests that led to the collapse of the Mubarak government in Egypt, Donia Kamal’s Cigarette Number Seven (American University in Cairo Press, translated from Arabic by Nariman Youssef) is not a tale of glorious revolution, but a depiction of a life in which Tahrir Square is only one of many competing priorities. The book traces snippets of Nadia’s life, from her childhood with her grandparents to her relationships with the men in her life, including her father. At the time of the 2011 revolution, Nadia’s father is aging and unwell, but no less enthusiastic about change than he was when he took her to protests as a child.

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Articles

El-Muniria Hotel and The Tangerinn, Tangier, Morocco
Jo Cahill

The Tangerinn, Tangier, Morocco

Photo credit: Kent MacElwee on Visualhunt / CC BY-NC-ND Website: https://www.facebook.com/thetangerinnpub/ Physical address: 1 Rue Magellan, Tangier Phone number: +212 613 321594 Business hours: 8pm-midnight daily DISCLOSURE: This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you buy something after clicking our link to the retailer, we make a small commission on the sale. You

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Hans Christian Andersen House, Odense
Jo Cahill

Seven travel bloggers’ best literary travel stories

There are thousands of literary travel destinations all around the world. Visiting them can enhance your understanding of an author’s work – not to mention blow out your travel budget and to be read list on new books! – but not all of them are equally worth your time and hard-earned cash. So how do you know which places you should add to your bucket list, and which are best visited in your imagination? In this post, seven travel bloggers have taken the time to tell you about their experiences with some of the world’s best literary destinations.

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Terra Kulture, Lagos, Nigeria
Jo Cahill

Terra Kulture Book Store, Lagos, Nigeria

More than just a bookstore, Terra Kulture is a hub for all things culture in Lagos, Nigeria. Recommended by novelist, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, as one of her favourite spots in the city, and location of choice for the launch of her acclaimed book, Americanah, Terra Kulture is a popular venue for locals, expats and visitors from around the world.

Read More »
El-Muniria Hotel and The Tangerinn, Tangier, Morocco
Jo Cahill

Hotel El-Muniria, Tangier, Morocco

When William S. Burroughs, author of Naked Lunch, arrived in Tangier, Morocco, in the mid-1950s, he found a city ready to indulge him in any vice that took his fancy. Jointly administered by France, Spain and the UK when it first became an international zone in 1924, its leadership had become even more cosmopolitan with Portugal, Italy, Belgium, Sweden, the Netherlands and the USA joining in on the action later.

Read More »